Author: Ryan

Star Trek V: The Final Frontier

Year: 1989
Directed By: William Shatner
Written By: William Shatner, Harve Bennett (story), Michael Loughery (screenwriter), Gene Roddenberry (Star Trek)

RYAN’S REVIEW

What’s interesting about this time around is that William Shatner himself got behind camera. There he could really make sure he looked good, even giving himself a Stallone-esque Cliffhanger moment to start the film. Kirk flirting with death while he scales the mountain is really the most interesting thing going on in the beginning. Up until the Klingons show up in that awesome Bird of Prey the movie is kind of lame. The whole camping scene is just silly, and boring.

I was being wildly optimistic when I started this film. As it continues I can see that it is really disappointing. I’ve seen this movie before but it’s probably been fifteen years at least. Not that I really expected it to be good but this level of bad has really caught me off guard.

I hate to criticize William Shatner too much but this one is a really weak movie. I’d call it the weakest but I really didn’t like The Voyage Home. The story that he conceived was horrible plain and simple. Shatner was inspired by a fascination with televangelist who could so easily manipulate the public and for what it’s worth that is an interesting aspect of society. Still, it’s a stretch for one of these men, who also happens to be Spock’s brother, to manipulate the entire crew of the Enterprise away from Kirk.

Glad to see all of Shatner’s rock climbing comes in handy later in the film as he is climbing ladders, that is until Spock comes and carries him the rest of the way. These boots Spock is wearing, whose idea was that? His Superman moment in the beginning of the film was ridiculous but here he is now squeezed between Kirk and McCoy with more boot shenanigans.

There’s too much time left in this movie, this one is even harder than The Voyage Home.

The whole scene with God is crazy. It’s a good thing Kirk and Spock are OK after God lasers them, and it’s comical how McCoy rushes to both of them on the ground and simply holds them as if he is treating them. The afterthought Klingons show up near the end to play their wild card only for that threat to be neutralized instantly with a resolution that leads to everybody being friends. They’re literally all having a party together moments after trying to kill each other and everybody is just all hunky dory.

I was wrong before. The fourth film is not the worse, this one is. At least this one has conflict but I just can’t say anything nice about it. It’s amazing the franchise continued beyond this film. It’s definitely not worth your time, you gotta be a serious Trekkie to like this movie. I mean they go back to Row Row Row Your Boat at the end, who thought this was a good idea?

NEXT MOVIE: Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991)

 

Star Trek III: The Search for Spock

Year: 1984
Directed By: Leonard Nimoy
Written By: Harve Bennett, Gene Roddenberry (Star Trek)

RYAN’S REVIEW

I have always felt this third movie fell into the odd and even theory of Star Trek films but only because there are significant problems with the story. This movie is deeply tied into Star Trek roots being made by one of the cast members and there is plenty to like about it. Nevertheless, watching this movie is simply waiting for the inevitable to happen. You know it’s only a matter of time before Kirk is back in the captain’s chair and it’s only a matter of time before Spock returns. The Klingons are the wild card in the film and they do keep things interesting. It’s a totally OK movie but it is far from great.

This movie got back to the basics and used the Klingons as the villains, and I think that was awesome. I thought Christopher Lloyd‘s performance was a little over the top, but these Klingons are ruthless. It’s totally lame when Doc Brown chokes that snakelike thing to death but when he gives the order to kill one of the hostages he’s just cold blooded. I do like that Kruge and Kirk have a fight to the death as the planet destroys itself around them. I also love the last Klingon that is really disappointed that he isn’t going to be killed. The Klingon would rather be put to death than face defeat. You just can’t go wrong with Kingons as the villains in a Star Trek film.

This is the first appearance of the Klingon Bird of Prey ship and it is by far the coolest ship to date. It really sucks that Kirk has to destroy the Enterprise but at least he got a bitchin new ship in the process. This movie is the middle of a three film arc and they get to fly around in the Bird of Prey for the fourth film too.

Star Trek is better with Spock and what this whole movie boils down to is a Star Trek movie with practically no Spock. You have Spock’s dad but what a poor substitute. I thought Leonard Nimoy did a good job behind camera and had an obvious influence on the very Star Trekkie feel to certain parts of the movie. The scenes on Earth when McCoy goes to the bar and sees a wide variety of aliens, including those fur ball things I can’t remember the name of, specifically come to mind as an example of what I’m talking about.

William Shatner really tries to pull out the acting big guns when his son is killed. Falling to his knees and getting choked up as he screams at the Klingon bastard. I think that moment in the film could have been much more dramatic. When Doc Brown gives the order to kill one of the prisoners, he doesn’t care which one, the scene wasn’t drawn out enough. You have Saavik, David, or Spock to choose from and one of these important characters is going to be killed. While Saavik is the one chosen David steps up to defend her with a really weak fight before getting stabbed to death. It’s interesting that Kirk’s sacrifice of his son and his ship counter balances the sacrifice of Spock in the preceding film.

There is a lot to like about this movie but nothing that really sets it apart from the others. I think the story is the main problem because it is all a build up to the return of Spock and we all know that one way or another he will return and be alright. This movie works for the Trekkies but I don’t think the average person would ever sit down to this film and enjoy it.

If you’re a Trekkie you don’t need my opinion about this film because you out rank me in fandom. However, if you aren’t a Star Trek fan then frankly I’m shocked you’d still be reading this. This is a good enough Star Trek film but it’s not going to make any new fans. I’d say it’s easily worth the time of Trekkies everywhere but not for anybody who isn’t into it.

NEXT MOVIE: Star Trek III: The Voyage Home (1986)

Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home

Year: 1986
Directed By: Leonard Nimoy
Written By: Leonard Nimoy (story) Harve Bennett and Nicholas Meyer (screenplay) Gene Roddenberry (Star Trek)

RYAN’S REVIEW

I’ve never understood this film as a conclusion to the two preceding films. There was so much potential here to create a story that could have brought culmination to the Klingon conflict but they went in a drastically different direction. The movie begins with the Klingon outrage over Captain Kirk and Genesis only for a new obscure threat to break in and take precedent. It all seemed like an excuse to put the crew back in modern times like it was just for fun. It also served as an excuse to get all political about the environment. This movie has always been my least favorite Star Trek film, because it isn’t Star Trek.

Maybe if they didn’t have this great build up to a conflict between the Federation and Klingons I could accept this story. There is all this background talk over the last two films about a treaty between the two and this movie starts with those talks falling apart because of Captain Kirk. That’s a great story set up and it should have led to a climactic conflict between the two. That would have been really cool, but instead this other story got in the way. A probe threatens to destroy Earth because it can’t communicate with an extinct species of whale. The actions of man have led to grave consequences in the future and that’s this movie in a nutshell.

How would Spock be able to identify the sound the probe was making as the songs of humpback whales? Not only is he talking about a long since extinct species on Earth but he just got reborn and can’t even remember his relationship with Kirk. It’s just silly and I don’t know what Nimoy or the producers were thinking when they pitched this story. They just completely ignore the most obvious direction the film should have taken.

The fish out of water scenario that the crew find themselves in during present day San Francisco is quite funny. You have Spock mind melding the punk rocker, Russian Chekov walking around asking about nuclear wessels, Kirk trying to explain Spock as having done too much LDS in the 60s and so on. All really funny stuff but Star Trek has never been about comedy. Yeah you get a zinger here and there but there is no need to make an entire film for that purpose. Nevertheless, all the crew members get a moment to shine in this one and that is worth something.

I don’t subscribe to the odd and even theory of Star Trek films specifically because of this movie. This is an even numbered sequel so should be considered one of the better films but I just don’t think that’s the case. I think the movie could have been great had it gone in the right direction but it went a different, much sillier, way. I don’t care for the time travel or the political message about whaling.

Yeah whaling is awful, but it’s ridiculous for Star Trek to take a stance against it. I mean come on, Khan quoted Captain Ahab like nonstop in The Wrath of Khan. You can’t go from putting the most famous whale hunter of all time in the limelight to sending a message about how wrong it all is.

I’m not entirely sure of the status of humpback whales today. To the best of my knowledge whaling is no longer a thing and there are still plenty of them in the ocean. Amber and I found ourselves at a wonderful west coast paradise in January of 16 and we saw plenty of them in the ocean from the resort pool. They would lunge out of the water and splash down into the sea, it was a really breathtaking sight. Do I have this film to thank for that possibility?

Somehow I doubt Star Trek had anything to do with the presence of humpbacks in our current ecosystem but I hope someone out there still feels like he/she accomplished something. I know a fact about humpback whales that I picked up in college and kept along my journey through life. Humpbacks have hip bones, they are vestigial body parts. They aren’t attached to anything but they are there and prove that at one point whales had legs and walked the Earth. That makes sense given they are mammals but it’s a tidbit of information I throw out there anytime evolution comes up. I don’t pretend to know anything about anything, but that’s an interesting piece of information.

This movie has no villain, no space battles, and no real danger for our characters. It’s more like an episode for the show and less like a movie. I just don’t like it and I find it disappointing. It ends without even touching on the Klingon problem it was building up to in the previous film and in the beginning. I think this is one of the weakest Star Trek films and I’ll leave it up to you if it’s worth your time or not.

NEXT MOVIE: Star Trek: The Final Frontier (1989)

Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan

Year: 1982
Directed By: Nicholas Meyer
Written By: Harve Bennett and Jack B Sowards, Gene Roddenberry (Star Trek)

RYAN’S REVIEW

It’s always been said that the even numbered Star Trek films are the good ones while the odd numbered films are not. I don’t think this is true but these first two films certainly hold up the theory. The first film wasn’t very well received and it was impossibly boring. Then this even numbered sequel came along and blew everybody away. This one had excitement, revenge, and tragedy all rolled into one. It’s the foundation of the entire series because another slow moving Star Trek movie would have effectively killed the franchise.

Gene Roddenberry immediately started work on the sequel following the release of the first film. It turned out that the studio had a different idea in mind as they blamed Roddenberry for the failure of the first film. Not only was the first film poorly received but it went way over budget too. Roddenberry’s idea was scrapped along with Roddenberry himself who was relegated to the role of “Executive Consultant” for the film. With Roddenberry out of the way the film was put in the hands of a producer who had never seen the show before, Harve Bennett. He proceeded to watch all Star Trek episodes and centered on the episode featuring Khan as a the direction for the next film.

I have never seen the original episode that featured Khan but I think it was one of the best ideas that any of the films have had for a story. Most of the films are independent stories with no connection to the television series they are based on beyond the characters. I think the best films in the entire series are the ones that tie to the show. Those movies of course being this one and the eighth installment featuring the Borg. I didn’t really care for the reboot sequel going back to this story line instead of coming up with something new but I’ll get to that in time.

I’m always a sucker for a good bad guy and Khan really fits the bill. He’s intelligent, powerful, and really pissed off. He has languished away in a wasteland for decades with nothing but misfortune to spurn him on. He is so full of anger and out for revenge. In all his bare chested prowess Ricardo Montalban gave an incredible performance. I love how he is always quoting Moby Dick as it is one of the most famous revenge stories in literature, and in this case it makes sense. I am unfamiliar with any of Montalban’s other work but this performance alone has always left an impression on me. I love how intimidating he is as an opponent to Captain Kirk. There is no single villain throughout this entire series that can even come close to Khan, and he’s one of the biggest reasons this movie is such a fan favorite.

This movie is also a fan favorite because it features some of the best space battles of any of the films. When Khan initially ambushes the Enterprise he delivers such a crippling blow. It puts Kirk in the very situation he was overseeing with Saavik in the beginning of the film. When she was in the Kobayashi Maru training protocol facing a no win scenario. One of my favorite lines comes after this first attack when Khan makes demands to Kirk. Captain Kirk asks how he knows Khan will keep his word to which he replies, “Oh, I’ve given you no word to keep, Admiral. In my judgment, you simply have no alternative.” Such a great bad guy. The second battle between Kirk and Khan was even better but came at the greatest of costs.

Much like the first film it was difficult to get Leonard Nimoy on board for a second film. He agreed to the part after being promised he would be killed off in a blaze of glory. What a glorious death it was too. Spock’s selfless sacrifice saved everyone else and made for a very emotionally compelling scene. Spock and Kirk’s final conversation as Spock dies is some of the finest dialogue written in the entire series. It was a bold move to kill off the most popular character. They didn’t just kill him off either but they did so in such dramatic fashion. Nimoy was so impressed with the final product that he didn’t just agree to return but wanted to get behind camera himself and direct it.

Nobody really has to die when science fiction is involved, you just have to be clever about it. Spock didn’t stay dead for long with the studio announcing before this movie was even released that he would be back. This film marks the beginning of a three film story line and the next film picks up directly where this one left off. Even beginning with footage of the ending of this film.

There aren’t many Star Trek films you can point to and say “that’s what it’s all about.” Not many glowing examples that can explain the more than fifty year fascination with Star Trek. This movie is one of the few you can have someone watch and maybe they’ll understand. It’s the undisputed best movie featuring the original cast. I think this movie is worth the time of not only Trekkies but the wider audience out there. This isn’t just a cool Star Trek movie, this is a cool movie plain and simple.

NEXT MOVIE: Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984)

 

 

Star Trek: The Motion Picture

Year: 1979
Directed By: Robert Wise
Written By: Harold Livingston (screenplay) Alan Dean Foster (story) Gene Roddenberry (Star Trek)

RYAN’S REVIEW

It’s time to admit it and own up to the truth. There’s no denying it now as we’ve reached this point in the collection. I’ve been a closet Trekkie for my entire life and own twelve of these movies. It’s not my fault. I was born into a Star Trek family and grew up watching these movies and the television show. I don’t know any Klingon or anything like that but I have a greater knowledge than the average person. I tell people all the time that Amber is the one who loves Star Trek but that’s not true. It’s me, and I have dragged her along this journey before.

It was about eight years ago when Amber and I were really young parents. We had some kind of petty argument that all young couples have but in this one I managed to win and she wanted to make it up to me. She had always refused to watch Star Trek and with this newfound marital leverage I insisted she watch the entire series with me. I’ll never forget because it was around Christmas time when I went to a Best Buy and bought a box set of the first eight movies. I stood in line holding this box set of Star Trek movies literally trying to hide it as people walked by. Like I said, I’m totally a fan but I don’t just admit that to people. I keep it in the closet as a guilty pleasure and deny knowing anything about it when it comes up. I stood in that line for what felt like forever, switching that box set from arm to arm in an effort to hide it from people. When I finally got to the register I laid it down in front of the lady and said “my Christmas shopping is done.”  Eight movies later and Amber still hated Star Trek, but I like to think I enriched her life in an interesting way.

I grew up watching the Next Generation series of Star Trek and it’s those characters I have always been a real fan of. I still appreciate the original crew and like these movies but some of the excitement in this first film has always been lost on me because of it. Half of the fun in this movie for Star Trek fans must have been seeing the gang get back together for a film. The show had finished its three year run in 1969 and ten years had passed by the time this movie came out. Star Trek had proved to be very popular airing in syndication and the movie spent a long time in production. Eventually it was scrapped in favor of doing a new television show before again minds were changed and the movie was back on the docket. This film was adapted from the pilot episode of what would have been the new television show.

The return of Spock is probably the coolest part of this movie, which doesn’t have all that many cool parts to begin with. It’s cooler because there was a big chance Spock didn’t appear in the movie at all. Leonard Nimoy had become angry over his image as Spock being used without him receiving any royalties and was initially not going to reprise his role for the film. He agreed to appear in the film only after he was paid before hand for the use of his image. It’s hard to imagine what would have happened to this franchise and Star Trek in general had they not been able to persuade Nimoy to take the role.

This movie reminds me of 2001: A Space Odessey in that everything moves really slowly. 2001 was a great movie that is incredibly influential in the movie business but I’d hardly call it watchable. I own the movie and have tried to watch it at least five times but have somehow still never seen the end. This movie too feels unwatchable at times as it takes forever for anything to happen. It’s like they figured out these new special effects and had to draw them out as long as possible.

This is a long and slow moving movie that I have never really been a fan of. I found myself sucked in more than I ever have before with this viewing but still, it is what it is. It’s impressive that the franchise was even able to continue after this film, given it wasn’t really well received. William Shatner has even been reported to have walked out of the screening and thought that Star Trek was officially over, and he wasn’t the only one. Gene Roddenberry was blamed for the failure of the film and was forced out for the sequel. That’s a cold way to treat the creator but it worked as the sequel was, for a long time, the franchise’s crowning achievement.

I think there was a time and place for this movie and that was 1979. Watching it now comes without all the anticipation that fans felt back then. It was probably really cool to see the band get back together for the big screen after ten years but that does little to satisfy a viewer today. I think this movie is for the die hard Star Trek fans out there. While I may have outed myself as a fan in this post it is still something I intend to keep quiet and I don’t qualify. I don’t think this movie is worth your time but may it live long and prosper with the true Trekkies out there.

NEXT MOVIE: Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982)

 

Stargate

Year: 1994
Directed By: Roland Emmerich
Written By: Dean Devlin and Roland Emmerich

RYAN’S REVIEW

When I was 10 years old this was one of the movies playing at the Uptown theater when I went to visit my dad in Washington D.C.. That theater’s single giant screen was my babysitter in those days and I spent plenty of time sitting in front of it during those visits. No theater has ever come close to being quite as magical as the Uptown was to me as a 10 year old. I would sit on the first row of the balcony and watch whatever was playing over and over again. I’m partial to all the movies I saw on that screen but it really helps that this one is so cool.

I really like the idea behind this movie. They don’t make such original science fiction anymore, or at least I haven’t seen anything like it. I like that the military has been keeping this ancient technology under wraps for decades trying to figure it out. When they get it operational the adventure begins and some of Earth’s greatest mysteries are there to be discovered. It’s a portal to another world and the military is sending a team through it into the unknown. The blending of ancient Egyptian culture, the military, and aliens is just awesome. Really cool idea that was ahead of its time. Unfortunately it’s one of the many that are destined for the eventual reboot that will probably just sully the original.

I really hope a reboot never comes to fruition. They could never top this one, and why even try? Where the hell are they gonna find anyone who can rock a flat top and beret like Kurt freaking Russell? Can’t do it! It didn’t work when they rebooted Total Recall. It didn’t work when they rebooted RobocopThey keep trying to carry on The Terminator franchise to no avail. Alien keeps trying to hang on with new movies and clearly that isn’t working. There’s just no way they should even try to remake this movie because it’s a bad idea. This movie is fine the way it is and it left its mark in the science fiction genre. We need movies like this, but not this. Certainly there are still people out there coming up with interesting ideas, we need more original science fiction these days and more than simply reboots and sequels to older properties.

I think this is one of, if not the, best movies made by Roland Emmerich. He has almost become like a gimmick director at this point specializing in disaster films. While those movies have become redundant I still like him as a director. After all, those disaster flicks aren’t terrible, I’d easily say that were worth watching one time as a rental. Maybe none of those disaster flicks qualified for our collection but I have a couple of Emmerich’s movies on the shelf and I’m quite fond of them. Independence Day is a very popular film but I have always had problems with it and never watched the sequel.

I think the music in this movie is exceptional. The theme they use anytime Ra is on screen is particularly compelling with its sinister sound. I am not very familiar with the film’s compser David Arnold, but I really like what he came up with. Sometimes a musical score can make or break a film. I don’t think the score here did either but it greatly enhances the film.

As I am want to mention I grew up in an action movie fanatic household. So, naturally I think Kurt Russell is awesome and I really like him in this movie. He rocks the shit out of that beret Demolition Man style. Dressed all in black and wearing that beret he should have been called Colonel John Spartan in this movie but I’ll let it slide. Kurt Russell is just too likable delivering lines like “Give my regards to King Tut asshole.” I’ve never been a big James Spader fan but I liked him in this movie. He apparently thought the movie was going to be awful but took the part for the money. Spader wasn’t the only one not really invested in the film as the actor who portrayed Ra, Jaye Davidson was apparently very difficult to work with. As a matter of fact he never acted again after this. I thought he was good though, of course all his lines are dubbed with that badass voice and all he had to do was look really evil.

This has been a fairly influential film in a way I am generally unfamiliar with. It inspired a television series that has been around a long time, I guess. I don’t know very much about it but I understand there is some minor crossover between the film and show. I only bring it up because this movie also inspired something that I cherish. There was an awesome direct reference to the film in one of the South Park Imaginationland episodes:

 

This is the best scene I could find on YouTube but you can see the Stargate and hear Kurt Russell as he is attacked by the Woodland Critters. Earlier in the episode Kurt Russell asks why he is there with this military crew and the response is “because you were in that movie that was kind of like this.” Hilarious, if you haven’t seen Imaginationland you should seek it out, some of the funniest stuff South Park has ever done.

This movie is special to me because it gets me all nostalgic over magical childhood memories. It’s a good movie aside from that though and there are plenty of reasons to like it. It’s got a real Chariots of the Gods feel to it and people love those wild theories. If you are a fan of science fiction this is a must see and I think the movie is easily worth your time to see it.

NEXT MOVIE: Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979)

Spider-Man 3

Year: 2007
Directed By: Sam Raimi
Written By: Sam Raimi, Ivan Raimi, and Alvin Sargent. Based on characters creasted by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko.

RYAN’S REVIEW

Everybody hated this movie but I always liked it because it was everything I wanted out of a Spider-Man movie. I am a sucker for the effects. I love to see that cool Spider-Man shit and this movie is overloaded with cool Spider-Man shit. Yeah Topher Grace was a lame choice for Eddie Brock but beyond that I don’t know what everyone hated so much. I liked the black suit, I liked the story overloaded with villains, and I loved seeing all these characters together again for a third go round. The biggest problem I had with it was that some of the fight scenes featured Peter doing the fighting instead of Spider-Man.

They put too much thought into the second movie for me. Yeah it was cool but I loathed sitting through all the slow moving character development while I was waiting for Spider-Man to be swinging through the streets. This movie featured three villains, and because of that there was tons of Spider-Man swinging around and being awesome. Of the three films this movie featured some of the coolest Spider-Man sequences and that’s all I have ever really cared about in this franchise. In 2007 if I wanted to see a serious movie I’d check out No Country for Old Men, when I wanted to see something fun and awesome I went to see this one. While plenty were disappointed I was pleased cause I got exactly what I wanted.

This movie still preceded the MCU and while plenty of movies were trying to recreate the success of Spider-Man nothing came close to this franchise even the third time around. Even though this movie wasn’t well received it still managed to be the highest grossing film of the year. That’s the number one reason they shouldn’t have rebooted this franchise but followed through with the idea for a fourth film. There was no reason to scrap a successful franchise in favor of a reboot nobody wanted. It still frustrates me to this day. While the character would have needed to be rebooted eventually in order to enter the MCU we still could have gotten another couple of cool films before that took place.

People can hate on this movie all they want, I will always think they are wrong. Spider-Man was already awesome enough but when they put him in that black suit he got even cooler. In the black suit his movements are so fluid and so much more powerful. I love when he is doing back flips on the side of a building and I love when he nosedives straight toward the ground before swinging up at the last second. This movie is full of awesome Spider-Man moments. The visuals of him saving Gwen Stacy from the crane accident are simply spectacular.

I think we can all admit that where this movie went wrong was casting Topher Grace as Eddie Brock. While I’ve read Topher Grace put on an impressive 20 something pounds to play the part that hardly matters when you only weigh 100 pounds to begin with. Eddie Brock is supposed to be a bulky and intimidating figure. Grace just didn’t fit the bill, but I still thought Venom was cool. He was forced into the story by the studio but I wasn’t disappointed by it. It only meant there was more Spider-Man action to be had.

I have also heard many people criticize the scene when Peter is dancing around the streets. Yeah it’s totally lame but it wasn’t so bad it sullied my opinion of the film. I looked at is as “oh, Peter is being dorky again, even when trying to be cool.” I saw it as part of the character and never gave it a second thought. That didn’t annoy me near as much as being forced into seeing The Sandman as kind of a good guy. I like bad guys to be just that, bad guys. Why am I supposed to feel sorry for this guy? The Sandman proved to be a pretty cool bad guy when the action started but far too often we are having his stupid sob story shoved down our throat. He keeps talking about not being a bad guy but then keeps breaking the law, totally lame.

It’s pretty cool to finally see Harry step up and take over his father’s mantle as the Green Goblin. I thought he was great as a bad guy and as a good guy in this movie. While we’re supposed to feel sorry for this criminal sob story of a Sandman Harry manages to win us back by actually doing the right thing. In the end of the movie the Sandman is still wreaking havoc for some disillusioned reason while Harry swallows his pride to fight the good fight. The action scenes with he and Spidey fighting in tandem are really exciting.

I remember that following this movie the studio did have a fourth film planned with everyone reprising their roles. If I remember correctly the story would have features John Malkovich playing the Vulture. I think the pressure the studio was putting on Sam Raimi had something to do with him pulling out of the project and then it all fell apart. When Raimi left the project the whole thing was scrapped and they announced the reboot. The rest is history as the new franchise never achieved the success of its predecessor and ultimately Sony decided to throw in the towel and start over again in conjunction with Marvel.

I miss this franchise and would have loved to see it continue beyond this third film. However this turned out to be the end of it and while plenty of people were disappointed I still stand behind it. I thought it was a good movie and I think it’s worth your time to see it.

NEXT MOVIE: Stargate (1994)